The first thing I had to learn when leaving Google was how to find a job.

Back in 2005, when I was about to graduate from college, I didn’t get the chance to develop any job-searching skills. Instead, my first full-time job found me. Someone referred me to Google, a recruiter contacted me, interviews were organized, and I got a job offer.

I was terrified at the time. I wasn’t sure I wanted to have a purely technical career (I’ve always had a strong interest in organizational behavior and management of development). I didn’t think I would fit in the computer-geek paradise that Google marketed itself as (I didn’t code in my free time, I didn’t contribute to open source, I wasn’t a “real hacker”). But I didn’t have anything else lined up, and I thought it would be madness to reject a perfectly fine job offer without having an alternative. So I accepted.

As a consequence, when I quit Google I had to learn to find a job. This is how I went about it.

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One of the hardest things about having a blog is deciding what to write about. Many subjects interest me. I have opinions on many topics. I have experience in a few areas. How to choose which ones to write about?

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” […] Every day there are more sounds, and I’m afraid that, some day in the future, every sound that’s possible to make will be in the world at the same time. And since every sound has its opposite, they will cancel each other out, and at the end of the day there’ll be billions of machines with their percussive rhythms, and billions of words in a language that doesn’t work anymore, and billions of people trying to be heard, screaming their lungs out, hurling their impotent noises into a world so saturated with noise that it might as well be deaf, and dumb, and blind.”

Now it’s Astrid’s turn to say nothing.

“All the noises of the world add up to silence,” says Harold. “This world will begin and end in silence.”

Dexter Palmer: The Dream of Perpetual Motion

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Like the famous mad philosopher said, when you stare into the void, the void stares also; but if you cast into the void, you get a type conversion error. (Which just goes to show Nietzsche wasn’t a C++ programmer.)

Charles Stross: Overtime

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I’ve been reading this blog by somebody I know from my knitting adventures. She hadn’t written for a while, but then at the end of December she started writing again. She writes about not writing, and about life. Mostly about life. And about how life gets in the way of making, writing.

It is inspiring. And humbling, very humbling. I sit in my (our!) studio, reading her blog, and daydreaming about writing like that. Writing openly about what’s on my mind, in my heart. That’s so very brave. I mean, somebody could read it! And then there is the Internet Archive and stuff. Sigh.

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He didn’t know what to feel. It occurred to him that human emotion had not evolved quickly enough to keep up with what mankind’s scientific capabilities demand of it. Sometimes the tiny components that make up an experience just didn’t fit in to existing emotional receptors, and the result was simply numbness.

Christian Cantrell – Containment

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Ana Ulin

Working to be a better human every day. Steward of engineering teams. I see you.